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Rev. Philip Blamo
Rev. Philip Blamo

Former Broadcast Journalist of the Liberia Broadcasting System and former member of the Press Union Of Liberia (PUL). Founder and President of the New Creation International Ministry.


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Created: 10th Jul 2010
Modified: 11th Jul 2010
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Professional Information
Employer:
New Creation International Ministry
Position:
Pastor and Humanitarian
Working primarily in:
Liberia

Biographical Information
Rev. Philip Blamo
(At a Glance)
Date of Birth: Jul/22/1964
Gender: male
Location:
  39 Josephine Ave
  City: West Haven
Tel: 203-3924822
Place of Origin: Liberia

Rev. Blamo Remembers His Origin, Urges Others to assist

(Jun 10, 2010) By: Omari Jackson
Rev. Philip S. Blamo
 

 Rev. Philip S. Blamo never forgets his past, and now he is doing something about it.

“I know where I come from,” he said in a telephone interview with The Liberian Journal (TLJ) from his residence in West Haven, Connecticut Saturday, “and I must do something about it.”

Doing something about it,”Involves the construction of a 12-room classroom”, along with a science lab and a community library, in Logan Town, near Monrovia.

“I think about the education of the people,” he said, “and knowing how I grew up, I am giving back to my community.”

Rev. Blamo holds a degree in religious studies from the Baptist Theological Seminary in Jacksonville, Texas. He has also worked with Mercy Ships, for two and a half years as a missionary, and was instrumental in negotiating for ships recent visit to Liberia. “We must begin to look back,” he said, “and help out.”

That message resonates with many Liberians in the United States, who read a report on his project in Logan Town.

“Many have called me,” he said, “to encourage me in on what I am doing.”   What he is “doing” involved spending his personal resources, amounting to $ (US) 25,000. 00.                 


                            Rev. Blamo's School Project under construction

He said his contribution, when the project is completed, will give children a chance to learn.

“The building is nearing completion,” he explained, “and this is a modest sacrifice, for I cannot feel comfortable to know that many young children don’t have the opportunity to get education.”

He said primary education is fundamental to every child’s growth, noting that while many Liberians in the US have called to commend him, a few others wanted to know why he must venture into the educational area, when, according to them, there is an authority responsible to provide education for children in Logan Town.

“I’m not angered about such suggestions,” he said, “however; we cannot leave the education and the rebuilding of our country to the government alone.”

“We live in a country, (US),” he said, “where individual sacrifice towards people is central, why then must some people see personal sacrifice as something against the established order.”

Blamo, now a minister of God, said, “I’m not deterred at negative comments some people have made to me, or may say,” because he cannot stand by when he is in the position to make a modest contribution to help out.

“If we care about Liberia as our country,” he said, “then we must care about the people as our own.”

The former broadcaster, LBS-Liberia, said, “Many Liberians have expressed their overwhelming support for the project, and therefore I want those from Logan Town and living in the United States to join me in making a difference.”

Making a difference, he said, “Means making a modest contribution to the project.”

He said, “If we can join our resources together, we can help many more Liberians to reach their dreams.” The project, he said, is set to be completed December 2011, “If some needed things are available.”

The government of Liberia has unveiled a Poverty Reduction Strategy, also called PRS, which essentially calls for the involvement of Liberians in the Diaspora in forming partnerships in realizing the dreams of Liberians at home.

While Rev. Blamo’s project may not be a direct result of the PRS, he believes Liberians in the Diaspora stand a better chance at knowing what is wrong with the society and can better find means to ease it.“We (Liberians) must not lose our determination to rebuild our country,” he said, “for it is only Liberians who can build it well.”

Rev. Blamo Remembers His Origin, Urges Others to assist

Rev. Philip S. Blamo never forgets his past, and now he is doing something about it.

“I know where I come from,” he said in a telephone interview with The Liberian Journal (TLJ) from his residence in West Haven, Connecticut Saturday, “and I must do something about it.”

Doing something about it,”Involves the construction of a 12-room classroom”, along with a science lab and a community library, in Logan Town, near Monrovia.

“I think about the education of the people,” he said, “and knowing how I grew up, I am giving back to my community.”

Rev. Blamo holds a degree in religious studies from the Baptist Theological Seminary in Jacksonville, Texas. He has also worked with Mercy Ships, for two and a half years as a missionary, and was instrumental in negotiating for ships recent visit to Liberia. “We must begin to look back,” he said, “and help out.”

That message resonates with many Liberians in the United States, who read a report on his project in Logan Town.

“Many have called me,” he said, “to encourage me in on what I am doing.”   What he is “doing” involved spending his personal resources, amounting to $ (US) 25,000. 

 He said his contribution, when the project is completed, will give children a chance to learn.

“The building is nearing completion,” he explained, “and this is a modest sacrifice, for I cannot feel comfortable to know that many young children don’t have the opportunity to get education.”

He said primary education is fundamental to every child’s growth, noting that while many Liberians in the US have called to commend him, a few others wanted to know why he must venture into the educational area, when, according to them, there is an authority responsible to provide education for children in Logan Town.

“I’m not angered about such suggestions,” he said, “however; we cannot leave the education and the rebuilding of our country to the government alone.”

“We live in a country, (US),” he said, “where individual sacrifice towards people is central, why then must some people see personal sacrifice as something against the established order.”

Blamo, now a minister of God, said, “I’m not deterred at negative comments some people have made to me, or may say,” because he cannot stand by when he is in the position to make a modest contribution to help out.

“If we care about Liberia as our country,” he said, “then we must care about the people as our own.”

The former broadcaster, LBS-Liberia, said, “Many Liberians have expressed their overwhelming support for the project, and therefore I want those from Logan Town and living in the United States to join me in making a difference.”

Making a difference, he said, “Means making a modest contribution to the project.”

He said, “If we can join our resources together, we can help many more Liberians to reach their dreams.” The project, he said, is set to be completed December 2011, “If some needed things are available.”
               

(Jun 10, 2010) By: Omari Jackson
Rev. Philip S. Blamo
 

 Rev. Philip S. Blamo never forgets his past, and now he is doing something about it.

“I know where I come from,” he said in a telephone interview with The Liberian Journal (TLJ) from his residence in West Haven, Connecticut Saturday, “and I must do something about it.”

Doing something about it,”Involves the construction of a 12-room classroom”, along with a science lab and a community library, in Logan Town, near Monrovia.

“I think about the education of the people,” he said, “and knowing how I grew up, I am giving back to my community.”

Rev. Blamo holds a degree in religious studies from the Baptist Theological Seminary in Jacksonville, Texas. He has also worked with Mercy Ships, for two and a half years as a missionary, and was instrumental in negotiating for ships recent visit to Liberia. “We must begin to look back,” he said, “and help out.”

That message resonates with many Liberians in the United States, who read a report on his project in Logan Town.

“Many have called me,” he said, “to encourage me in on what I am doing.”   What he is “doing” involved spending his personal resources, amounting to $ (US) 25,000. 00.                 


                            Rev. Blamo's School Project under construction

He said his contribution, when the project is completed, will give children a chance to learn.

“The building is nearing completion,” he explained, “and this is a modest sacrifice, for I cannot feel comfortable to know that many young children don’t have the opportunity to get education.”

He said primary education is fundamental to every child’s growth, noting that while many Liberians in the US have called to commend him, a few others wanted to know why he must venture into the educational area, when, according to them, there is an authority responsible to provide education for children in Logan Town.

“I’m not angered about such suggestions,” he said, “however; we cannot leave the education and the rebuilding of our country to the government alone.”

“We live in a country, (US),” he said, “where individual sacrifice towards people is central, why then must some people see personal sacrifice as something against the established order.”

Blamo, now a minister of God, said, “I’m not deterred at negative comments some people have made to me, or may say,” because he cannot stand by when he is in the position to make a modest contribution to help out.

“If we care about Liberia as our country,” he said, “then we must care about the people as our own.”

The former broadcaster, LBS-Liberia, said, “Many Liberians have expressed their overwhelming support for the project, and therefore I want those from Logan Town and living in the United States to join me in making a difference.”

Making a difference, he said, “Means making a modest contribution to the project.”

He said, “If we can join our resources together, we can help many more Liberians to reach their dreams.” The project, he said, is set to be completed December 2011, “If some needed things are available.”

The government of Liberia has unveiled a Poverty Reduction Strategy, also called PRS, which essentially calls for the involvement of Liberians in the Diaspora in forming partnerships in realizing the dreams of Liberians at home.

While Rev. Blamo’s project may not be a direct result of the PRS, he believes Liberians in the Diaspora stand a better chance at knowing what is wrong with the society and can better find means to ease it.“We (Liberians) must not lose our determination to rebuild our country,” he said, “for it is only Liberians who can build it well.”

Rev. Blamo Remembers His Origin, Urges Others to assist

(Jun 10, 2010) By: Omari Jackson
Rev. Philip S. Blamo
 

 Rev. Philip S. Blamo never forgets his past, and now he is doing something about it.

“I know where I come from,” he said in a telephone interview with The Liberian Journal (TLJ) from his residence in West Haven, Connecticut Saturday, “and I must do something about it.”

Doing something about it,”Involves the construction of a 12-room classroom”, along with a science lab and a community library, in Logan Town, near Monrovia.

“I think about the education of the people,” he said, “and knowing how I grew up, I am giving back to my community.”

Rev. Blamo holds a degree in religious studies from the Baptist Theological Seminary in Jacksonville, Texas. He has also worked with Mercy Ships, for two and a half years as a missionary, and was instrumental in negotiating for ships recent visit to Liberia. “We must begin to look back,” he said, “and help out.”

That message resonates with many Liberians in the United States, who read a report on his project in Logan Town.

“Many have called me,” he said, “to encourage me in on what I am doing.”   What he is “doing” involved spending his personal resources, amounting to $ (US) 25,000. 00.                 


                            Rev. Blamo's School Project under construction

He said his contribution, when the project is completed, will give children a chance to learn.

“The building is nearing completion,” he explained, “and this is a modest sacrifice, for I cannot feel comfortable to know that many young children don’t have the opportunity to get education.”

He said primary education is fundamental to every child’s growth, noting that while many Liberians in the US have called to commend him, a few others wanted to know why he must venture into the educational area, when, according to them, there is an authority responsible to provide education for children in Logan Town.

“I’m not angered about such suggestions,” he said, “however; we cannot leave the education and the rebuilding of our country to the government alone.”

“We live in a country, (US),” he said, “where individual sacrifice towards people is central, why then must some people see personal sacrifice as something against the established order.”

Blamo, now a minister of God, said, “I’m not deterred at negative comments some people have made to me, or may say,” because he cannot stand by when he is in the position to make a modest contribution to help out.

“If we care about Liberia as our country,” he said, “then we must care about the people as our own.”

The former broadcaster, LBS-Liberia, said, “Many Liberians have expressed their overwhelming support for the project, and therefore I want those from Logan Town and living in the United States to join me in making a difference.”

Making a difference, he said, “Means making a modest contribution to the project.”

He said, “If we can join our resources together, we can help many more Liberians to reach their dreams.” The project, he said, is set to be completed December 2011, “If some needed things are available.”

The government of Liberia has unveiled a Poverty Reduction Strategy, also called PRS, which essentially calls for the involvement of Liberians in the Diaspora in forming partnerships in realizing the dreams of Liberians at home.

While Rev. Blamo’s project may not be a direct result of the PRS, he believes Liberians in the Diaspora stand a better chance at knowing what is wrong with the society and can better find means to ease it.“We (Liberians) must not lose our determination to rebuild our country,” he said, “for it is only Liberians who can build it well.”




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